9 Inventive Ideas For Improving Cities (via CoExist)

From parking sensors to home help for teachers, here are some of the latest and greatest ideas for making cities better.

Last summer, the Center for an Urban Future and NYU Wagner published a report identifying a series of creative ideas for improving cities. They’re now back with a follow-up study, featuring another 25 urban innovations. We picked out some of the best.

http://www.fastcoexist.com/3024629/9-inventive-ideas-for-improving-cities

9 Inventive Ideas For Improving Cities (via CoExist)

From parking sensors to home help for teachers, here are some of the latest and greatest ideas for making cities better.

Last summer, the Center for an Urban Future and NYU Wagner published a report identifying a series of creative ideas for improving cities. They’re now back with a follow-up study, featuring another 25 urban innovations. We picked out some of the best.

http://www.fastcoexist.com/3024629/9-inventive-ideas-for-improving-cities

synergyenterprises:

Synergy has been supporting the launch of this new website for repurposing building materials in Victoria. You can post, purchase and trade at www.removeandreuse.com. Check it out!

synergyenterprises:

Synergy has been supporting the launch of this new website for repurposing building materials in Victoria. You can post, purchase and trade at www.removeandreuse.com. Check it out!

Visit the tc10k event page

What better way to spend an early Sunday morning in April, right?

Victoria Beer Week - March 1-8, 2014

…Are you aware that Victoria is known worldwide as a hub of brewing innovation? Don’t miss your chance to attend a world class event and sample some great brews in March!

unconsumption:


Over the past two decades governments around the world have been experimenting with a new strategy for managing waste.  By making producers responsible for their products when they become wastes, policy makers seek to significantly increase the recycling­-and recyclability­-of computers, packaging, automobiles, and household hazardous wastes such as batteries, used oil motor, and leftover paint­-and save money in the process.
This strategy, known as extended producer responsibility (EPR), is the subject of a new special feature in Yale University’s Journal of Industrial Ecology. The special feature examines the use of EPR across diverse scales-­from countries to provinces and states­-and investigates work underway in the U.S., the European Union, Canada, China, Brazil and the State of Washington.  The application of EPR to e-waste is a particular focus of the research in the special feature.
The Journal of Industrial Ecology is a bimonthly peer-reviewed scientific journal, owned by Yale University, published by Wiley-Blackwell and headquartered at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.
Articles in the special feature are freely downloadable for a limited time at:  http://jie.yale.edu/EPR

(via Shifting the Burden of Recycling: Yale Journal Explores the State of Extended Producer Responsibility | Discard Studies)

unconsumption:

Over the past two decades governments around the world have been experimenting with a new strategy for managing waste.  By making producers responsible for their products when they become wastes, policy makers seek to significantly increase the recycling­-and recyclability­-of computers, packaging, automobiles, and household hazardous wastes such as batteries, used oil motor, and leftover paint­-and save money in the process.

This strategy, known as extended producer responsibility (EPR), is the subject of a new special feature in Yale University’s Journal of Industrial Ecology. The special feature examines the use of EPR across diverse scales-­from countries to provinces and states­-and investigates work underway in the U.S., the European Union, Canada, China, Brazil and the State of Washington.  The application of EPR to e-waste is a particular focus of the research in the special feature.

The Journal of Industrial Ecology is a bimonthly peer-reviewed scientific journal, owned by Yale University, published by Wiley-Blackwell and headquartered at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.

Articles in the special feature are freely downloadable for a limited time at: http://jie.yale.edu/EPR

(via Shifting the Burden of Recycling: Yale Journal Explores the State of Extended Producer Responsibility | Discard Studies)

Cheese’s champs 2013 at the thetis lake relay

aplacecalledpau:

Versailles & Paris

My friend Steph (Stéph?) is living in France right now. Needless to say I’m very jealous as it’s one of my favourite places I’ve ever visited.

agritecture:



When brilliant design transforms the way children think about the playground, the entire world takes note. Perhaps this is what Vo Trong Nghia Architects had in mind when they designed The Farming Kindergarten — which is a prototype for sustainable school design where children of factory workers in Vietnam can learn how to grow their own food. Set to be complete later this year, the school building will house 500 children and feature a knot-shaped rooftop, which will be used as a vegetable garden. The roof’s surface pours into a continuous loop around three courtyard playgrounds and slopes from the ground to the peak of two stories, making an easy climb to the vegetable garden a fun adventure for teachers and their pupils. Click through our gallery to see more of this schoolhouse magnificence.
“While these internal courtyards provide safety and comfortable playgrounds for children, the roof makes a landing to the courtyards at both sides, allowing children to enter a very special eco-friendly experience when they walk up and go through it,” the architects told Dezeen.
The Vo Trong Nghia team is no stranger to receiving accolades for their innovative, and earth-friendly designs. Nghia was awarded last year at the World Architecture Festival for his naturally ventilated Binh Dunong School that made use of vertical louvers and perforated screens instead of expensive and energy zapping air conditioning to keep buildings cool in the tropical weather.
The design of the new Farming Kindergarten also presents an exploration in education. Visible energy-saving architectural elements of the building design include: water recycling, solar water heating, pc-concrete louver for shading and more, to help children see their role in sustainable and responsible living.
SOURCE

agritecture:

When brilliant design transforms the way children think about the playground, the entire world takes note. Perhaps this is what Vo Trong Nghia Architects had in mind when they designed The Farming Kindergarten — which is a prototype for sustainable school design where children of factory workers in Vietnam can learn how to grow their own food. Set to be complete later this year, the school building will house 500 children and feature a knot-shaped rooftop, which will be used as a vegetable garden. The roof’s surface pours into a continuous loop around three courtyard playgrounds and slopes from the ground to the peak of two stories, making an easy climb to the vegetable garden a fun adventure for teachers and their pupils. Click through our gallery to see more of this schoolhouse magnificence.

“While these internal courtyards provide safety and comfortable playgrounds for children, the roof makes a landing to the courtyards at both sides, allowing children to enter a very special eco-friendly experience when they walk up and go through it,” the architects told Dezeen.

The Vo Trong Nghia team is no stranger to receiving accolades for their innovative, and earth-friendly designs. Nghia was awarded last year at the World Architecture Festival for his naturally ventilated Binh Dunong School that made use of vertical louvers and perforated screens instead of expensive and energy zapping air conditioning to keep buildings cool in the tropical weather.

The design of the new Farming Kindergarten also presents an exploration in education. Visible energy-saving architectural elements of the building design include: water recycling, solar water heating, pc-concrete louver for shading and more, to help children see their role in sustainable and responsible living.

SOURCE

(Source: agritecture)